Research

My research explores biogeochemical connections between land and water at landscape to macrosystem scales.  I use a combination of field/lab methods, satellite remote sensing, and GIS analyses to examine ecosystem processes of estuaries, rivers, and lakes. My CV is available here. If you have questions about my research, please don't hesitate to contact me!

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DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN the ARCTIC 

The Arctic is rapidly changing in response to climate warming. Aquatic systems and estuaries dominate much of the Arctic, and are vital to understanding carbon cycling across the entire region. In the Arctic, my research uses satellite remote sensing and laboratory analyses to address three questions: Where does riverine organic matter (OM) come from? What is the fate of OM as it moves from headwaters to estuaries? How are OM dynamics changing in response to climate?

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REMOTE SENSING OF WATER QUALITY IN TEMPERATE LAKES

The Upper Midwest (MN, MI, WI) is dotted with tens of thousands of lakes of different colors, trophic states, sizes, and watershed features.  Remote sensing allows us to map colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) across the region, and use that data to explore watershed controls on lake chemistry; trends in lakes DOM through time; and model lake DOM storage.

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STORM-DRIVEN NITROGEN EXPORT TO TEXAN ESTUARIES

Nitrogen from agricultural run-off and wastewater drives estuarine eutrophication. In coastal Texas, alternating wet-dry years results in large variations in nitrogen delivery from rivers.